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Chronological index
2013–2017

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Chronological index
2013–2017

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Laboratory automation systems and workcells product guide, 2/13:68

Steve Jobs’ words resonate in all markets: You can’t just ask customers what they want and try to give it to them; by the time you build it, they’ll want something else. That logic is one reason why makers of laboratory automation systems and workcells, the focus of CAP TODAY’s product guide on pages 69–87, strive to offer solutions that meet customers’ needs today while being lithe enough to tackle the challenges of tomorrow.

Anatomic pathology systems product guide

February 2013—In the market for an anatomic pathology system? Check out the 27 AP offerings from 24 vendors. The systems profiled in this annual product guide are commercially available in the United States. In this year’s lineup for the first time is information pertaining to whether vendors provide a list of client sites to potential customers on request.

Cytopathology and More | Endometrial cells in Pap tests—when are they significant?

January 2013—Use of the Papanicolaou test has significantly decreased the incidence of cervical carcinoma, especially cervical squamous cell carcinoma. For endometrial adenocarcinoma, which is the most common malignancy of the gynecologic tract there is no cost-effective screening test. The Bethesda system 2001 recommends reporting normal endometrial cells in women 40 years or older and any atypical endometrial cells under the atypical glandular cells category.

How anticoags work, and what that means for labs

January 2013—Anticoagulants are dangerous drugs. If too much is given, the patient could bleed and bleed to death; if too little is given, the clot that was an inch long and sitting by the ankle suddenly starts growing up toward the knee. Once it gets above the knee, it has about a 50-50 chance to break off and enter the lung as a pulmonary embolism.

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